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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 27
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
by air chairman ron brown, the new members of congress, the new blood, the new direction that we are giving. finally, i want to thank the members of my brilliant, aggressive, unconventional, but always winning campaign staff. they were unbelievable. [cheers and applause] and they have earned this. i want to say a special word of thank you to two people who lost their lives in the course of this campaign, without whom we might not be here tonight. our friends, paul tully and rick ranger. they are looking down on us tonight and they are awful happy. not very long ago, i received a telephone call from president bush. it was a generous and forthcoming telephone call of real congratulations and an offer to work with me in keeping our democracy you running and effective in an important transition. i want you all to join with me tonight in expressing our gratitude to president bush for his lifetime of public service, for the effort he made from the time he was a young soldier in world war ii, to helping to bring about an end to the cold war, to our victory in the gulf war, to the grace
>> practically anybody who was brown or black, procter we anybody who believes that immigration is an issue that needs to be tackled. was a case where the republican party is stampeding towards prevalence if they don't catch up to the new america and the changing demographics. you cannot have a ruling coalition that is virtually all white. you had president obama put together this new rising coalition and put together enough of the old democratic coalition to win. he got more than 7% of hispanics -- 70% of hispanics. young voters. the republicans are missing the idea of trying to expand their percentage of a shrinking electorate. this is becoming a majority- minority nation. this is probably the last time the republicans love a chance to win like this. >> let's talk about why this happened. how about mitt romney? how did he try to reach out to these people? >> i was talking earlier about the fundamental assumptions underlying the campaign. romney's campaign believes the economy was basically going to be the single biggest reason that would turn voters away from the president. there was an a
, please. >> i am wondering what impact you think a link-up moderate senators, such as brown, lugar, college are going to have on the negotiation? >> we have been waiting for some time, including actor for example senators snowe and lugar announced they were retiring, for change, and has not been there. they continued along the path in following the leadership of senator mcconnell. whether it changes now is an open question. i suspect it will a little bit, and it may well for senator brown, depending on when we get an announcement or if there is an announcement that john kerry going to be named secretary of state, in which case there will be a special election down the road for that senate seat, and you will see scott brown become the great conciliator as he prepares for the election. for others, they will continue to take their clothes from what the leaders say or what the members do. there the question is whether mcconnell basically becomes at least five things a more passive actor and lets lamar alexander and bob corker and tom coburn take the lead and doing something that he wil
selective. as far as california legislature, willie brown gender -- gerrymandered us with democrats controlling. are broken overspent and overtaxed. our senators are not helping us. guest: i actually don't think i am being that selected. lyndon johnson on the civil rights act, had great support from the northern democrats and the western democrats. was able to overcome the southern democrats opposition with the help of the republican party. i said that about everett dirksen so i am not really being that selected. i do think my book touches a bark -- upon the origins of the problems we have today, the toxic politics of america started in the late 1970's. one of the problems, very frankly, was the opposite -- was proposition 13 in 1978, the tax revolt that rolled in from california. i think the first basic no-tax pledge, the revolt of 1978, has been greatly responsible for california's decline. host: in the incoming term in the senate, there will be a record number of women, 20 women in all, serving in the senate. your book focuses primarily on men. do you see a shift in the operation
this manifest itself? look at scott brown. as moderate a guy -- in the previous panel they were talking about congress is to do to work together. where you need moderate republicans. you need moderate democrats. on the republican side, scott brown, who probably would have been one of these people that crossed party lines, he loses. linda lingle in hawaii. she would have been an asset for the kind of congress that pulls things together. she was a terrific candidate in ran a great campaign. running as a republican in a democratic state, the president's home state this particular year just rang up no sale. heather wilson in new mexico is another one like that. moderate republicans running in blue states all lost. look at their counterparts. democratic moderates running in red states. he did manage to win in indiana in a non-democratic wave year. it was probably impossible in 2010. but in a relatively level playing field environment, it was still something. the fact that democrats were still in the hunt in north dakota -- i have not looked to see what the president's number was there. it was pret
environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and heather wilson. the problems -- the problem with the republicans -- they have some very ideologically driven voters, but part of the republican base is more open to voting for democrats than the democratic base is to vote for republicans, i believe. that even example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north dakota. mitt romney one north dakota by 21. and i was able to overcome that. it is true that she -- that the president one north dakota slightly less than -- at mitt romney 1 north dakota at slightly less than the president's won massachusetts. but the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but as more willing to vote for democrats. john barrow in georgia, the republican candidate was horrendous. a challenger refused to debate the incumbent. [laughter] i didn't say it was a bad decision, i just said it says something about the challenger. i think this is an additional problem. it is easier for moderate, centrist democrats to feel the republican voters than
. governor brown is put this plan down but have you had a plan like that, would you arm the economy? the way to think about is that there are two eat? -- what is the near-term potentially negative effects of lower coverage. the other is the sigh of relief that we go from a world where we have an imbalance that they cannot sustain to world were you consider what the rules of the game will be in the future. if you focus your reforms on long-term changes to entitlements, you create a sigh of relief effect. the $4 trillion number -- i want to " glenn kessle/. he said no serious budget analyst would agree with this. >> this shows that if you want to do a serious deficit reduction plan and still be able to make important investments in education and infrastructure wrinkly energy that will build a strong economy and great strong middle-class jobs go to court, it has to be balanced approach. it would involve spending cuts and neutral revenue. the president has shown his budget top end come tax folks have to let their marginal rate go up to the sense that was during kim's own -- clinton. you can come
question about how you spend your money. if i gave a lot of money to the effort to beat brown in ohio, i want to know how did we spend $20 million in unanswered media against someone who is clearly in all the pulling of the beginning was in a tough race and he won. how did we spend $20 million to $30 million in an intermediate against tammy baldwin in wisconsin and did not win? i think it may be that they just did not spin it right or ineffectively or that the old traditional tools where we put up -- i was in wisconsin the last weekend and i was watching my tv and it was sort of a pretty traditional grainy pictures of tammy and liberal, liberal and liberal and best friend of nancy pelosi and blah blah blah. obviously, it did not work. maybe the traditional people in either party who tell us to buy all of this broadcast tv are wasting people's money. the millionaires and billionaires to put money into these things will ask that question. what exactly did you spend my money doing and why didn't it work? >> i think i generally agree. there are a couple or three silos. people will be constru
. there is a congressman from georgia named paul brown who happens to be a doctor. he thinks that the big bang theory and evolution are works of the devil. you know, that is not the future. go to maryland, go to the maryland suburbs and look at the companies that are making billions of dollars doing genetic research. genetic research is all about evolution. >> are there additional questions? >> i just wanted to ask about when you saw effective black and latino alliances during the 2012 election? >> and the places where there were blacks and latinos living in proximity, all the states where there are both black and latino populations, in florida, virginia, less so in colorado. the black population is fairly small. nevada, definitely. the right in the country and especially the ultraconservatives in the republican party had pushed african-americans and hispanics together. they have a politics where sort of a nasty braggadocio, if you watch the primaries, where you have to be slashed and burn in how you attack your enemies, that very much does not go over with hispanics. some of the things that were sa
but last year, 30% of seasonal employees were able to get your brown positions once the season was over. -- to get a year round positions once the season was over. host: planning to spend less, go ahead -- caller: people are making comments about the holiday. every year, we go through this. the contras as get a good education and be good at your job and spending money the way you want to spend it. people will come out at christmas and take care of their kids. if you work all day long and cannot buy the stuff with your own money, you might as well stop working. i don't care how bad the economy gets, people will still spend money. year after year we see commercials and people still buy a pack of cigarettes or spend $30 for gas. what are you working for? you have to spend it. what's the use of having money? guest: i agree that you should be able to use your money any way you want but it is important for folks to pay attention to their long-term financial stability. that means a mixture of spending as well as saving. and investing. earlier this year, there was discussion that consumers are
, mr. miller, and the gentlewoman from florida, ms. brown, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i yield myself such time as i i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. miller: the legislation before us does in fact designate the veterans affairs building in carrollton georgia as the trinka davis veterans village. trinka was a businessperson who desired that her estate be used to benefit veterans and their families. following her death, the trinka davis estate contacted the v.a. popt in the -- hospital in the area and determined there was a need to better serve the vet veterans in northwest georgia. as such, the foundation worked with local v.a. leaders to plan, design and construct a clinic and presented the $17 million gift in kind to the v.a. the 73,883 square feet clinic, which opened to veterans in september, provides primary, home-based and mental health care and a number of specialty services including physical and occupational therapy. it encompasses a 42-bed community living center that pr
. sherrod brown, and in ohio, almost more than 30% of his votes were from african- americans. bob casey, more than 20% of his votes in pennsylvania came from african-americans. the success the democrats had with their senate candidates this year dovetails very nicely with president obama's campaign in terms of turning out african- american voters. i the guy will stop there and entertain questions >> do we have any questions? >> [inaudible] what are your thoughts on some of the patterns you see in terms of that regional stuff? is there anything that jumps out at you? >> last year at this time, i was presenting a paper called resegregation in southern politics. i have not had the chance this morning to look at arkansas, at the state legislature. i know all members of the state members of the legislation and arkansas were up for election this year and all lot of money was put into the state to change the state legislature from being democratic to be republican. if it does in fact flip in this election, all 22 of the state legislatures in the south will now be republican majorities. >> we'r
the state. just ask scott brown. we will now go to oregon, on our line for republicans, ilene. from one of those non-swing states. good morning. caller: good morning. i thank you for c-span and all that you do for the election is wonderful. i am a republican but i did vote for gary johnson. i watched the debate on your channel. and i had not voted, and we vote by mail here -- had i not devoted and we vote by mail, i probably would have voted for obama. i think he did a stellar job. with the correct name. i think you for your programming. host: are there issues you wish the candidates would address more but you think they are not because oregon is not considered a battleground state? caller: jobs of course. we are one of the poorest states. i volunteer at a food bank. i cannot believe how fast we have grown up. because of lack of employment. and it is sad, it is very, very sad. >> thank you for the call. we want to show you a clip of the governor romney yesterday in virginia. one of those swing states. yesterday he campaigned with majority leader eric cantor, a congressman from virginia.
will not go out into the lake and brown. [video clip] >> tonight is a tremendous benefit to republican women, tea party women. for all of you, this is your victory. let me say this. if president obama means what he says on the campaign trail, if he is interested in working order to bring the people together to reduce the deficit and get people working, i will work with him. but if he continues down the same path, then i will spend every waking moment fighting him. host: your thoughts? guest: the most important thing he said there is a fit the present is serious, serious about working with him. but the president is going to hang out in harry reid's corner of the world and let him get away without putting a budget on the table, not getting serious in the negotiations and really drilling down on something like simpson-bowles, what do you expect the opposition to do? they're not just going to sit there and fall in line just because. both sides now have an opportunity, i believe, to really come to a table with a serious plan and the let's have that fight. let's have that debate about the policy,
brown and cummings for holding this hearing today which focuses on it's noted that amtrak has a record of 30.2 million passengers. traveling on amtrak and full year 2011. year, amtrak has posted the highest total ever for that particular month with the final month of september also expected to be a new record. -- >> a 25% cut in funding and even more alarming not having a vision for high-speed rail network. these actions are detrimental to the transportation opportunities for all americans. the alternative to build more roads by more cars and consume more oil should not be our only solution. in fact, according to d.o.t., in comparison, in 1958 through 2012, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit, and yet amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that and compare it to the oil and gas industry, which received $441 billion in federal subsidies, although more than half of those have been available to the energy sector. we have spent to
in 1978 passed building standards under then governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons burry as governor moonbeam but he got it passed. so every building in california had energy standards and it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things -- i said portman and sheheen have been compromising. my view, katrina -- sorry -- sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or another. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry -- we have had 300 or -- sorry. phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four years we have had once in a hundred year disasters with irene, with sandy. and so, you know, i think it will give some impetus to deal with climate change, but even if we can't reach compromise on that, there's lots of things in energy that we can reach compromise on and that will be on the agenda. and the fourth thing i'd put on the agenda i talked about earlier in reference to your question, dave. maybe we can get some real fina
his head back and roar. and i thought, i could do that. motown, james brown, you name it. so much music. of course, hank williams. i parents used to play a lot of hank williams. that is it. >> the same. my upbringing was made into a world -- i am sure roger heard this music, but i was made to sit and listen to sinatra, of duke ellington, and when you heard ella fitzgerald sing, nobody has ever come close to her. in a sense, every young singer of the day has to be compared to her. later artists like aretha franklin, and then when i started to listen to the blues. how we wilallie wolf. roger does a great howling wolf. probably not. now using like a bird. and the guitar player is an extraordinary guitar player. often these guys in the background. i have trained to listen to the background. we share a lot of stuff. i would not call myself a musicologist. i would say i did not have any barriers whatsoever. i listened to everything. on the plane last night i was listening to niketti as i ate my spaghetti. [laughter] >> how did you all meet and decide to form a band? i had a band way bac
have lost track during the debate a brown sarbanes oxley and the debate about dodd-frank that our capital markets are the envy of the world. our equity markets are something that are unique to america. they are deep and strong and one of the key ways in which we keep growing an economy which is competitive in the world. that is why we have as to bob to come here. people in washington want to know what market participants think about this or that. today we have the market personified by bob greifeld, the ceo of the nasdaq. it is my great pleasure to welcome him to brookings. [applause] >> thank you for that kind introduction. i have to start by saying i first met glen be seven or eight years ago and at that time, i was a capable and focused business execs but did not have a lot of time to spend on views of the wider world. under his tutelage, that has changed and we have had a number of interesting discussions. as i stand here today and talk about certain policies, recognize if you happen to disagree with me, blam eglen what he has taught me. it is my great pleasure to be here at b
charlie brown my friends, this is a good bill. the president continues to move the ball, the democrats continue to move the ball, every time republicans want to do something positive on immigration, on the economy, they keep moving the ball away from us. let's stop being charlie brown, my friends, this is a good bill, it would strengthen our economy, it will create jobs and it is exactly what the president asked for a year ago. let's call his bluff and send him a bill to create jobs and opportunities here in america. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. without objection, the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit. the question is on the motion. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the noes have it. ms. lofgren: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20, this 15-minute vote
number. i hope that scott brown holds on. it is a tougher night than anybody saw a few months ago. >> i would like to make a comment and i do not mean to single out one individual. i have been struck by the fact that some of the superpac ads aren't very good. i would think that with all the money that all these outside groups have that they could have produced some better ads. i live in northern virginia so i see these ads and i think that the attacking team came -- productionhave low value. i would want to have a nice looking at. i would not want to just put something up there for the sake of having something on the air. >> thery are not aimed for us. talking about what they look like. >> i don't think this campaign has helped the government -- governing climate at all. this is contrary to some of the things he would have to get to get a deal with republicans. we will see if the president moves over far enough to do with the house and the house will reciprocate. sometimes it makes a -- takes a market timer to move both sides of their positions. you'd be surprised happens in a crisis ho
defeated senate candidate who would love to run for the open seat, scott brown, if kerry were to become secretary of state. it is true the foreign relations and foreign affairs committee have shown a little less influence as far as how far and policy is conducted. >> always good to use this as a reporting and opportunity. we don't know from our book whether it is menendez or boxer who would take the job -- who would it be? >> i suspect it would be menendez. i do not think to >> i suspect it would be menendez. i do not think boxer wants to give up energy and public works. i doubt she would want to do that. i think kerry's chances of becoming secretary of state increased when susan rice kind of flubbed her media response to the attack in benghazi, and she was already not well liked on the hill among republicans. recently when i saw former senator chuck hagel say nice things about bob kerrey who was re-running in nebraska, i thought, what in it be an interesting choice for the president to make? someone who was a longtime member of the foreign relations committee and who is very smart and
, and the continent's become a tan and brown and red. geographic features fade, leaving only the continental forms as you depart for their from earth. no national boundaries can be seen. the glow becomes smaller and smaller. and then you remember another statistic. it holds 3.5 billion people. of that 3.5 billion people, one half are hungry and two-thirds live in poverty. and you shudder to think that this problem will be much worse during the remainder of our lifetime, and at the end of the century, the population of the earth will be 6 billion or 7 billion. to solve the problem, he went on, of feeding this population and protecting this planet, it is going to take an international approach far beyond any cooperative effort ever seen in history. characteristically understated kantor in reflecting the turmoil of that particular moment in our history, exactly one month after the killing of four college students at another ohio campus, he said, i suppose we have to ask ourselves whether international cooperation on this scale is even possible. we are responsible for our rose. today, we honor and giv
.? >> amanda brown with public education network. building on steve's question, it strikes me that it doesn't necessarily need to be a federal role in promulgating standards, that these can be voluntary standards. for local education funds, this was a voluntary adoption process based on the standard of good conduct and their management. but there is a critique of the for-profit world historically that i wonder if standards or another mechanism can address. in the charter world, where you have an independent chartering authority that grants a charter to a for-profit school, but takes it out from under the public -- this school board, the elected officials do not have the ability to pull the charter. perhaps there will be an analogous critique. i wonder if standards or other mechanisms is a way to address that critique? you talk about accountability in terms outcome measures and so on, but the broader critique about governance. i wonder about that. >> i think the government's question is an important one, by and large, but different states do charters operating differently, there is still som
comfortable in massachusetts. i think that i've already told you how i feel about scott brown. >> what do you think are his priorities should be coming out of today's press conference? >> the president's priorities are what he outlined in his campaign. protect the middle class and small business. we are one vote away from that being accomplished. all we have to do is have the house of representatives bring up our bill. we brought up their bill. it was roundly defeated. so they should do this to help the american people. on all the other issues that the president has laid out a program on, job creation, we need to do that, so the president doesn't need any -- doesn't need any information from me. he knows what he's going to do. and he's pointed in the right direction. last question. >> [inaudible] >> most of you couldn't hear the question. but she said, what do i expect from the -- we'll be at the white house on friday and what about entitlement cuts? i've made it very clear. i've told anyone that will listen, including everyone in the white house, including the president, that i am not going
. host: he predicted a landslide. guest: he predicted sharon brown would have to find a new job. he predicted bill nelson would lose in florida. he got every single thing wrong but at least the next day he said i was wrong. carl rove has yet to say that. host: do you have another book in the works? guest: i have one in the works. you can follow me at billpress.com. host: thanks for stopping by. guest: it's always fun. >> this is 45 minutes. did not happen what tuesday? they had -- and got an affirmation of policies in the direction the president had articulated. there was not much reticulation there but i think they showed two things. politically, they are superior in terms of their ability to get their vote to the table and secondly, from a policy standpoint especially with the pickup in the senate of people, you look at the city, one of those four walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. it kind of makes the policy discussion take on a very different hue. for the republicans it was one of those come dejesus moments politically were the
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)